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American History

American History

The Huntington

The Huntington’s early American historical collections are important resources for the study of the Colonial and Revolutionary periods, the drafting of the Constitution, and the Civil War. Among the holdings are hundreds of autograph letters written by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, as well as the manuscript of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography. The Huntington can also claim the largest collection of autograph manuscripts of Abraham Lincoln west of Illinois. In conferences, seminars, and lectures, curators and visiting scholars discuss their subjects in depth.

121 - An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873
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  • 121 - An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873
    Thu, 17 Jan 2019
  • 120 - Golden: How California Made America
    Thu, 14 Mar 2019
  • 119 - The Lady and George Washington

    Mary Sarah Bilder, Founders Professor at Boston College Law School, discusses the responses of George Washington and Benjamin Rush to Eliza Harriot O'Connor's remarkable university lectures in 1787 and their implications for female political status under the Constitution. O'Connor was the first American female lecturer and principal of a female academy. This program is a Nevins Lecture.

    Wed, 12 Dec 2018 - 59min
  • 118 - A Mormon Diarist in California, 1850–1858

    Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, the 300th Anniversary University Professor of History at Harvard University, shares stories from the remarkable diary of Caroline Crosby. The wife of a Mormon missionary, Crosby reached California with her husband in 1850 en route to a posting in the South Pacific, and later lived among “saints and strangers” in San Jose, San Francisco, and San Bernardino.

    Wed, 10 Jan 2018 - 56min
  • 117 - Anton Roman: San Francisco’s Pioneering Bookseller & Publisher

    John Crichton, proprietor of the Brick Row Book Shop in San Francisco, shares the story of pioneering entrepreneur Anton Roman (1828–1903), who came to California from Bavaria in 1849 to make his fortune in the gold fields, then converted his gold into books and became one of the most important booksellers in the West.

    Wed, 17 Jan 2018 - 51min
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